Rss Feed Tweeter button Reddit button Delicious button Digg button Stumbleupon button Newsvine button
Lyme Disease Information on Lyme Disease
  • scissors
    June 21st, 2013Adminlyme diseae treatment

    My dog is 5 year old cocker spaniel. I found 2 deer ticks biting him 1 was in his ear and the other on top of his head. They were both there for a while because they were fat and white. I also want to know if there is any cures for lyme disease for a dog. thank you

    DefinitionLyme disease is an inflammatory disease characterized by a skin rash, joint inflammation, and flu-like symptoms, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi transmitted by the bite of a deer tick. See also tick removal.Alternative NamesBorreliosis Causes, incidence, and risk factorsLyme disease was first described in the United States in the town of Old Lyme, Connecticut in 1975, but has now been reported in most parts of the United States.Most cases occur in the Northeast, upper Midwest, and along the Pacific coast. Mice and deer are the most commonly infected animals that serve as host to the tick. Most infections occur in the late spring, summer, and early fall.The disease can sometimes be difficult to diagnose because the symptoms may mimic other diseases. A characteristic red rash usually occurs at the site of the bite. However, the bite may go unnoticed. A few months to years after the bite, joint inflammation, neurological symptoms, and sometimes heart symptoms may occur.The initial infection is called primary Lyme disease. From there, secondary Lyme disease and tertiary Lyme disease may develop.There are more than 16,000 cases of Lyme disease per year in the United States.Risk factors for Lyme disease include walking in high grasses, other activities that increase tick exposure, and having a pet that may carry ticks home.SymptomsDeer ticks can be so small that they are almost impossible to see. Therefore, many people with Lyme disease never even saw a tick. These people are more likely to develop symptoms because the tick remained on their body longer.The symptoms of Lyme disease include:A flat or slightly raised red lesion at the site of the tick bite (can be larger than 1 to 3 inches in diameter, often with a clear area in the center) FeverHeadacheLethargyMuscle painsStiff neckJoint inflammation in the knees and other large jointsAdditional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:Itching, overallunusual or strange behaviorSigns and testsPhysical examination in advanced Lyme disease may show evidence of joint, heart, or brain abnormalities Antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi by immunofluorescence (IFA) or ELISA. ELISA tests are confirmed with a Western blot test.TreatmentAntibiotics are prescribed based on disease stages and manifestations. Doxycycline, tetracycline, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and penicillin are some of the choices.Anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen, are sometimes prescribed to relieve joint stiffness.Note: Doxycycline is usually not prescribed for children until after all the permanent teeth have erupted. It can permanently discolor teeth that are still forming.Expectations (prognosis)If diagnosed in the early stages, the disease can be cured with antibiotics. If left untreated, complications involving joints, the heart, and the nervous system can occur. ComplicationsSecondary Lyme diseaseTertiary Lyme diseaseCalling your health care providerCall your health care provider if symptoms of Lyme disease develop. PreventionWhen walking or hiking in wooded or grassy areas, tuck long pants into socks to protect the legs, and wear shoes and long-sleeved shirts. Ticks will show up on white or light colors better than dark colors, making them easier to remove from your clothing. Spray your clothes with insect repellant.Check yourself and your pets frequently. If you find ticks, remove them immediately by using tweezers, pulling carefully and steadily.Ticks can be fairly large — about the size of a pencil eraser — or so small that they are almost impossible to see. After returning home, remove your clothes and thoroughly inspect all skin surface areas, including your scalp. Ticks can quickly climb up the length of your body. Some ticks are large and easy to locate. Other ticks can be quite small, so carefully evaluate all spots on the skin.

    Call a vet or petstore fast the will know what to do!!!

    A dog’s chance of getting Lyme’s disease are pretty good. Are you sure you removed deer ticks? They are the size of a pinhead. Are you in a state that has a high prevalence of Lyne’s such as Wisconsin and Maine. Check the prevalence in your state. The dog can be tested and will be given a long course of antibiotics just like a human. It will be about 4 pills a day for almost a month. Just went through this with my dog. The dog, unlike the human, can also vaccinated against Lynes.

    Your vet can run tests to see if its likely he got it. Doxicyclene is the antibiotic of choice to treat Lyme.

    I would get your dog to the vet ASAP to make absolutely sure you got all of the ticks.

    Not to scare you, but I was once told that ticks that make it into a dog’s ear can cause some very nasty damage if they keep traveling. ( I haven’t researched that bit of info myself, so I don’t know for certain that it’s true. )

    Here are some very informative Lyme Disease sites:

    http://www.thepetcenter.com/gen/lyme.html

    http://www.uspcak9.com/medical/lymedisease.shtml

    http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/petcolumns/showarticle.cfm?id=256

    Best of luck to your dog !

    Definition

    Lyme disease is an inflammatory disease characterized by a skin rash, joint inflammation, and flu-like symptoms, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi transmitted by the bite of a deer tick. See also tick removal.

    Alternative Names

    Borreliosis

    Causes, incidence, and risk factors

    Lyme disease was first described in the United States in the town of Old Lyme, Connecticut in 1975, but has now been reported in most parts of the United States.

    Most cases occur in the Northeast, upper Midwest, and along the Pacific coast. Mice and deer are the most commonly infected animals that serve as host to the tick. Most infections occur in the late spring, summer, and early fall.

    The disease can sometimes be difficult to diagnose because the symptoms may mimic other diseases. A characteristic red rash usually occurs at the site of the bite. However, the bite may go unnoticed. A few months to years after the bite, joint inflammation, neurological symptoms, and sometimes heart symptoms may occur.

    The initial infection is called primary Lyme disease. From there, secondary Lyme disease and tertiary Lyme disease may develop.

    There are more than 16,000 cases of Lyme disease per year in the United States.

    Risk factors for Lyme disease include walking in high grasses, other activities that increase tick exposure, and having a pet that may carry ticks home.

    Symptoms

    Deer ticks can be so small that they are almost impossible to see. Therefore, many people with Lyme disease never even saw a tick. These people are more likely to develop symptoms because the tick remained on their body longer.

    The symptoms of Lyme disease include:

    A flat or slightly raised red lesion at the site of the tick bite (can be larger than 1 to 3 inches in diameter, often with a clear area in the center)

    Fever

    Headache

    Lethargy

    Muscle pains

    Stiff neck

    Joint inflammation in the knees and other large joints

    Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:

    Itching, overall

    unusual or strange behavior

    Signs and tests

    Physical examination in advanced Lyme disease may show evidence of joint, heart, or brain abnormalities

    Antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi by immunofluorescence (IFA) or ELISA. ELISA tests are confirmed with a Western blot test.

    Treatment

    Antibiotics are prescribed based on disease stages and manifestations. Doxycycline, tetracycline, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and penicillin are some of the choices.

    Anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen, are sometimes prescribed to relieve joint stiffness.

    Note: Doxycycline is usually not prescribed for children until after all the permanent teeth have erupted. It can permanently discolor teeth that are still forming.

    Expectations (prognosis)

    If diagnosed in the early stages, the disease can be cured with antibiotics. If left untreated, complications involving joints, the heart, and the nervous system can occur.

    Complications

    Secondary Lyme disease

    Tertiary Lyme disease

    Calling your health care provider

    Call your health care provider if symptoms of Lyme disease develop.

    Prevention

    When walking or hiking in wooded or grassy areas, tuck long pants into socks to protect the legs, and wear shoes and long-sleeved shirts. Ticks will show up on white or light colors better than dark colors, making them easier to remove from your clothing. Spray your clothes with insect repellant.

    Check yourself and your pets frequently. If you find ticks, remove them immediately by using tweezers, pulling carefully and steadily.

    Ticks can be fairly large — about the size of a pencil eraser — or so small that they are almost impossible to see. After returning home, remove your clothes and thoroughly inspect all skin surface areas, including your scalp. Ticks can quickly climb up the length of your body. Some ticks are large and easy to locate. Other ticks can be quite small, so carefully evaluate all spots on the skin.

    Powered by Yahoo Answers

    Facebook Twitter Email
    Tags:
  • scissors
    June 14th, 2013Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    My brother was just diagnosed with lyme disease and I was curious if there was a way to prevent it… I know you can use tick spray and after being out in the woods checking for ticks but i was wondering if there was any other way?

    There is no other way to prevent Lyme disease other than to prevent tick bites. Once you’ve been bitten by a tick carrying Lyme disease, it gets into your bloodstream and can infect you. Most people who are bitten by a Lyme-carrying tick will develop the illness, whether shortly thereafter or in several months (or even years’) time, though some don’t. The ones who don’t are just naturally resistant to the disease, even if they carry it around in their bloodstream.The best ways to prevent tick bites are to avoid tick infested areas like dense forests, keep your arms and legs covered if possible, and wear bug repellent. For women, keeping your hair pulled back can also be helpful because it’s harder for a tick to crawl into your hair if it’s pulled back tightly into a ponytail, bun, or braids. Not all ticks carry Lyme disease, but particularly in the South it is fairly prevalent so the best thing you can do is just try not to get bit at all.

    Good sources of info about Lyme disease:

    http://www.lymedisease.org

    http://www.ilads.org

    http://www.canlyme.com

    http://www.lymenet.org

    http://www.lymeinfo.net

    http://www.lymediseaseassociation.org

    http://www.lymedoctor.com

    http://www.touchedbylyme.org

    Powered by Yahoo Answers

    Facebook Twitter Email
    Tags: