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Lyme Disease Information on Lyme Disease
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    June 6th, 2014Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    My brother was just diagnosed with lyme disease and I was curious if there was a way to prevent it… I know you can use tick spray and after being out in the woods checking for ticks but i was wondering if there was any other way?

    There is no other way to prevent Lyme disease other than to prevent tick bites. Once you’ve been bitten by a tick carrying Lyme disease, it gets into your bloodstream and can infect you. Most people who are bitten by a Lyme-carrying tick will develop the illness, whether shortly thereafter or in several months (or even years’) time, though some don’t. The ones who don’t are just naturally resistant to the disease, even if they carry it around in their bloodstream.The best ways to prevent tick bites are to avoid tick infested areas like dense forests, keep your arms and legs covered if possible, and wear bug repellent. For women, keeping your hair pulled back can also be helpful because it’s harder for a tick to crawl into your hair if it’s pulled back tightly into a ponytail, bun, or braids. Not all ticks carry Lyme disease, but particularly in the South it is fairly prevalent so the best thing you can do is just try not to get bit at all.

    Good sources of info about Lyme disease:

    http://www.lymedisease.org

    http://www.ilads.org

    http://www.canlyme.com

    http://www.lymenet.org

    http://www.lymeinfo.net

    http://www.lymediseaseassociation.org

    http://www.lymedoctor.com

    http://www.touchedbylyme.org

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    March 21st, 2014Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    How soon do the symptoms start appearing? Is it treatable? And what other diseases can dogs get from ticks? Symptoms of those?

    Do you realize what you just asked takes about a full week of lectures in a college Infectious Disease course?As someone who has taken such a course, I’ll try to summarize:In a lab, Lyme disease symptoms can take 2 to 5 months to appear after exposure. The most common symptoms are lameness, loss of appetite and fever. In some dogs, Lyme can affect the heart and cause heart failure, or the central nervous system and cause uncoordination or weakness. And in a few rare cases, Lyme disease can cause a fatal kidney inflammation and shutdown (Lyme-associated nephritis).Symptoms of Lyme are vague. A dog can get any, all, or some of them. And once Lyme disease causes problems, it can be difficult to cure completely (that’s why human physicians commonly prescribe medication after tick bites – you can cure Lyme if treated right away.) Once a dog is sick, the symptoms often do get much better with antibiotics. But sometimes the disease just hides and the dog relapses later. Or the dog may be perfectly healthy the rest of it’s life – there’s no guarantee.But not all dogs who test positive for Lyme will get sick, either. Your vet will guide you in the proper course of testing and treatment. The best thing for you to do is prevention:1) Keep your dog on a tick preventative (Frontline Plus kills ticks; Advantix, Vectra 3D, or the Preventic collar repel and kil ticks) all year round (there is some stage of some species of tick active all year round).2) Avoid tick habitats as much as possible. Mow your grass, and walk your dog on a leash where he stays on the sidewalk.3) If he’s been in the woods or fields, check your dog for ticks daily. Remove any you find. (If you like, take it to the vet for identification. Only certain species carry certain diseases. The vet can also send it to a lab to see if the tick had Lyme, or he can test your dog – and repeat the test in 30 days if appropriate).4) If you live in a Lyme-endemic area (like the Northeast or Great Lakes US), and your pet is commonly exposed to woods or fields, consider getting him vaccinated against Lyme disease.Some other diseases that are commonly carried by ticks include:Rocky Mountain Spotted FeverEhrlichia canisAnaplasma phagocytophilum (also used to be called Ehrlichia equi)Anaplasma platysBabesiaThese diseases have varried symptoms. Most can cause fever (but that is not always seen). Some cause vascultis (which you see as a spotty rash and/or warm edema or swelling). Some cause lameness like Lyme. Some cause hemolytic anemia (you’d see signs of blood loss like weakness or pale gums or sometimes you might notice pink urine or a yellow tint to gums, eyes and/or skin). Some cause decreased platelets (you might see bruising, a spotty rash or unusual bleeding).

    Ask your vet.

    Lyme in dogs is treatable. Some dogs have no symptoms some dogs have lameness. If you suspect Lyme disease see your vet for a very simple test that takes about 10 minutes and only 2 drops of blood to run. It will tell you if your dog has lyme disease or heart worm or another tick born disease

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    January 10th, 2014Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    These are huge numbers taking into consideration how large the population of the United States is. This says a lot about how desirable are pets to Americans, especially dogs. With that said, dog related problems such as ticks, fleas, and vaccination are huge concerns. And the biggest concern among these is tick or fleas prevention. This is rational because pets generally stay inside the house with    .. more …

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    December 13th, 2013Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    I’ve heard that mice and dogs can act as hosts to the B. burgdorferi microbes that cause Lyme disease. If a mouse were hosting the bacteria and bit someone, could that person contract Lyme disease?

    Yes (maybe), though the deer tick is its primary vector there have been reports that the bacteria which causes the disease has been found in fleas and horseflies, however this is fairly rare and still being debated. As for your mouse example, they bite would have to allow them to exchange unlikely large quantities of bloods. Even if that were to happen the bacteria are generally presents in different forms when it is in different hosts in order to resist each hosts immune responses. It would have to shift forms very quickly after getting into the human which, which is highly unlikely making the mouse scenario VERY improbable.

    If the tick that is infected with lyme disease bites an animal and that animal bites you, yes you can get lyme disease. as soon as the ‘lyme’ goes into the blood stream of the animal, it has lyme. just put on bug spray whenever you go outside and you are ok. just make sure it has deet in it though!

    I don’t believe there has been any documentation that Lyme is spread from an animal bite. Most typically, it’s a tick bite. There is some evidence that it might also be transmitted via mosquitoes and/or fleas, but that hasn’t been conclusively shown yet. There is strong evidence that Lyme can be passed from a mother to her unborn child. Some experts believe it might be passed between sexual partners.

    That said, if you have Lyme (or think you might have it) and you don’t remember a tick bite–you are not alone. The ticks that carry this crummy disease are pretty small–especially the baby ones (called nymphs) and when they bite they inject you with an anesthetic, so you typically don’t feel anything. Also, while some infected people start showing symptoms right away, in others the disease seems to lie dormant–sometimes for years–before it rears its head and you get desperately ill.

    Good sources of info about Lyme disease:

    http://www.canlyme.com

    http://www.lymenet.org

    http://www.lymeinfo.net

    http://www.lymediseaseassociation.org

    http://www.ilads.org

    http://www.betterhealthguy.com

    http://www.publichealthalert.com

    http://www.freewebs.com/teenswithlyme

    http://www.lymetimes.org

    HIGHLY unlikely, Marisa. A bite from a mouse (?) or dog is “transiental” in nature (how’s THAT for as word!). Only the deer tick (in THIS neck of the woods, anyhowz) is an efficient transfer agent of the borrelia. And even IT needs nearly a day to engorge & begin to “fill up” on your tasty before the spirochettes on-board really start to disembark ‘en masse’ from their safe, mid-gut “seats” & into the victim’s bite area.

    The # of ‘ketes in the saliva & on the teeth of any infected mouse that might bite you (& the only time I’ve heard of someone getting bit this way is when they back the creature into a corner) is insignificant to non-existant. They prefer to corkscrew their way into tissue, not hang out in bodily fluids!

    (Not the way to go if ya want to survive as a parasite. 😉

    Don’t worry about the bite. Worry about any ticks that might POSSIBLY’ve hitched a ride during your intimate encounter!

    Now, where did Fido go to?…

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    September 27th, 2013Adminsymptoms of lyme disease
    lyme disease in humans

    9:11am Wednesday 28th August 2013 in News TICK bites could lead to Lyme disease if certain warning signs are not picked up early by Bolton residents, according to a local forester. In the UK, ticks    .. more …

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    June 14th, 2013Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    My brother was just diagnosed with lyme disease and I was curious if there was a way to prevent it… I know you can use tick spray and after being out in the woods checking for ticks but i was wondering if there was any other way?

    There is no other way to prevent Lyme disease other than to prevent tick bites. Once you’ve been bitten by a tick carrying Lyme disease, it gets into your bloodstream and can infect you. Most people who are bitten by a Lyme-carrying tick will develop the illness, whether shortly thereafter or in several months (or even years’) time, though some don’t. The ones who don’t are just naturally resistant to the disease, even if they carry it around in their bloodstream.The best ways to prevent tick bites are to avoid tick infested areas like dense forests, keep your arms and legs covered if possible, and wear bug repellent. For women, keeping your hair pulled back can also be helpful because it’s harder for a tick to crawl into your hair if it’s pulled back tightly into a ponytail, bun, or braids. Not all ticks carry Lyme disease, but particularly in the South it is fairly prevalent so the best thing you can do is just try not to get bit at all.

    Good sources of info about Lyme disease:

    http://www.lymedisease.org

    http://www.ilads.org

    http://www.canlyme.com

    http://www.lymenet.org

    http://www.lymeinfo.net

    http://www.lymediseaseassociation.org

    http://www.lymedoctor.com

    http://www.touchedbylyme.org

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    April 12th, 2013Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    Just wonding cause I feel like I have ether a candida infection or possibly parasites or worms and I’m looking for an over the counter treatment. I am on antibiotics as well so I wonder if worms could be caused by antibiotics or lyme disease or maybe more of a dungus candida infection.I say this cause of symptoms of stool with orange in it sometimes and gerd symptoms that come and go at different times, also sometimes i feel a little feverish and think this is all a sign of possibly candida as well as worms or parasites too.Any help is appreciated.Thanks

    Worms aren’t caused by anything but contact with worm eggs that have been dropped by another human, possibly on a toilet seat, which is where kids usually pick them up. They cause extreme itching, especially of the anus. There are simple remedies for them at the chemist.If you have candida there is also a remedy for that called Canestan. Ask your chemist.If you’re on antibiotics get some bio-active yoghurt to get some friendly bacteria back into your system, as antibiotics kill both useful and bad bacteria..

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    March 22nd, 2013Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    and has no energy. What is the disease and one causative organism?

    Morgan – While the animal skinner could have a disease NOT connected with skinning wild animals, he might have the well-known animal skinners disease called tularemia. Tularemia (also known as Pahvant Valley plague, rabbit fever, deer fly fever, or Ohara’s fever is a serious infectious disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. A Gram-negative, nonmotile coccobacillus, the bacterium has several subspecies with varying degrees of virulence. The most important of those is F. tularensis tularensis (Type A), which is found in North America and is highly virulent in humans and domestic rabbits. F. tularensis occurs mainly in aquatic rodents (beavers, muskrats) in North America and in hares and small rodents in northern Eurasia. It is less virulent for humans and rabbits. The primary vectors are ticks and deer flies, but the disease can also be spread through other arthropods. The disease is named after Tulare County, California. Also consider lyme dosease.The incubation period for tularemia is 1 to 14 days; most human infections become apparent after 3 to 5 days. In most susceptible mammals, the clinical signs include fever, lethargy, anorexia, signs of septicemia, and possibly death. Animals rarely develop the skin lesions seen in people. Subclinical infections are common and animals often develop specific antibodies to the organism. Fever is moderate or very high and tularemia bacillus can be isolated from blood cultures at this stage. Face and eyes redden and become inflamed. Inflammation spreads to the lymph nodes, which enlarge and may suppurate (mimicking bubonic plague). Lymph node involvement is accompanied by a high fever. Death occurs in less than 1% if therapy is initiated promptly.

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    February 22nd, 2013Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    what are the symptoms for lyme disease and ticks in dogs???

    Infected dogs may be lethargic, have a poor/loss of appetite, or a fever (103 – 105 F). Dogs may also experience lameness shifting from one joint to another, fatigue, kidney damage or failure, heart disorders, or neurologic involvement (e.g. aggression, confusion, overeating, seizures). Dogs can be infected with the Lyme bacterium but not exhibit any noticeable symptoms. Dogs appear to have the same expression of disease as humans, therefore, humans have been considered an animal model for dogs. Transplacental transmission has occurred in dogs.

    Coooooooo did a great job of answering. In addition to the clinical symptoms she lists, many vets now do yearly Lymes tests during annual exam. If you live in an area where deer ticks are prevalent, I highly recommend the annual tests. Two of my dogs have tested positive, despite the fact that I use Frontline. I even had a friend who contracted Lymes when we were on a hike with our dogs; we hiked Saturday and she was already having symptoms on Sunday, and diagnosed Monday.

    I’ve heard questionable things about the vaccines, and I have not chosen to go that route for either myself or my dogs despite the obvious Lymes risk in my area.

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    January 4th, 2013Adminsymptoms of lyme disease

    My wife and I are in the process of finding and adopting a labrador retriever from a lab rescue agency. We’re currently considering adopting a great 2-year-old dog named Bowie, but one thing his foster family told me is that he did test positive for exposure to both lyme disease and ehrlichiosis (two tick-borne diseases). I’m wondering if anyone has any experience with this. I have read a lot on the web about this and still am not sure whether the dog is going to have health problems his whole life regardless of treatment, or if the treatment can actually effectively return the dog completely to normal. We are going to be first-time dog owners, so a dog with serious health issues probably wouldn’t be in the best hands with us due to our inexperience. This dog is absolutely awesome, by the way. Very sweet, very calm, and very intelligent and curious about what the humans around him are up to.

    I did a report on Lyme Disease in particular. The treatment (for humans) has a 90 percent chance of keeping the symptoms away basically. So most likely, your new dog wouldn’t have any problems. But it would mean you’d have to be cautious when it comes to ticks because the treatment does not prevent getting any tick borne diseases again. But I’m all for the idea of getting the dog. It has probably suffered through a lot and it’d be great for the dog to have someone to give it attention and love. So yes, I think you should get the dog.

    Yes you should get it. This dog needs you more then ever right now so adopt him and give him a good life

    I adapted a dog with both these diseases and he was fine.

    Keep him well fed an a good weight.

    (Not too thin)

    Do a little research on the disease so that you know what you are in for. Sometimes special needs dogs can be to mcuh for some people. Make surethat you are willing to go through with this. Ultim. I would do it. The dog needs a home and he might be the perfect one for your family, but be prepared!!

    good luck.

    That is a question for your vet. I definitely would keep the dog IF the problems can be cured! What diseases are you referring to? Lyme? Rocky Mt. fever? This dog sounds like it is worth a very good effort.

    Also, if it isn’t contageous, or doesn’t get worse, or make it a carrier for the illness, or ruin it’s quality of life, then go for it.

    Cynda

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